Plant Index


 
 
 

Philadelphus coronarius

Philadelphus coronarius L.

european mock-orange


PLANT INDEX

ID_PLANT: PHCO7
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Philadelphus coronarius
Include in WOTAS: 0
Publish to Web: 1
Last Modified: 2020-01-01

GENUS INDEX

GENUS CODE: PHILA
GENUS SCIENTIFIC: Philadelphus
GENUS AUTHORITY: L.
GENUS COMMON: Mock orange
GENUS SUMMARY: A genus of 65 (or fewer) species, shrubs, of north temperate areas. The most recent monographer of the genus, Hu (1954-1955) recognizes many species and varieties on the basis of minor differences in pubescence. Many of the recognized taxa are based only on cultivated material. The native distributions of the varieties have little phytogeographic coherence, and several varieties are often reported from the same site, suggesting that they reflect merely variation within a population (if genetically based at all). For instance, Hu recognizes three varieties in P. hirsutus and five in P. inodorus, but these seem to be no more than forms. As Hu writes, the formerly recognized species, P. grandiflorus Willd., and P. laxus Schrad., are merely different forms of a species with heterogeneous leaf shape, size, and margins. Fostered by growers, propagated and distributed through cuttings, these forms have maintained their distinction in gardens since their discoveries. But when they are projected on the spectrum of variations exhibited by a large number of specimens collected from the homeland of P. inodorus Linn. they appear to be nothing but a few transitional forms. In this paper, these forms are treated as varieties. Hus varieties should be treated as forms or cultivars, if recognized at all. I have taken a conservative approach, though variation in several of our native species could use additional study.
GENUS IDENTIFICATION:
GENUS REFERENCES: Weakley & Henrickson in FNA (in press); Hu (1954-1956)=Z; A.E. Weakley (2002); Hufford in Kubitzki (2004).

FAMILY INDEX

FAMILY CODE: HYDRAN
FAMILY SCIENTIFIC: Hydrangeaceae
FAMILY AUTHORITY: Dumortier 1829
FAMILY COMMON: Hydrangea Family
FAMILY SUMMARY: A family of about 17 genera and 190-220 species, trees, shrubs, vines, and herbs, primarily north temperate. As here interpreted, the family Hydrangeaceae includes two well-marked groups, the Hydrangeae (including Decumaria and Hydrangea) and the Philadelpheae (including Deutzia and Philadelphus). This group has been shown by molecular research to be unrelated to the Saxifragaceae, and to have its closest affinities to the Loasaceae, Cornaceae, and Nyssaceae (Xiang et al. 2002; Soltis, Xiang, & Hufford 1995; Morgan & Soltis 1993).
FAMILY REFERENCE: Freeman in FNA (in prep.); Spongberg (1972); Soltis, Xiang, & Hufford (1995); Morgan & Soltis (1994); Xiang et al. (2002); Hufford in Kubitzki (2004).

NCBG DESCRIPTIVES

INTRO:
STEMS:
LEAVES:
INFLORESCENCE:
FLOWERS:
FRUITS:
COMMENTS:
HEIGHT:

DURATION: Perennial
HABIT: Shrub

LEAF ARRANGEMENT:
LEAF COMPLEXITY:
LEAF RETENTION:

FLORAL CHARACTERISTICS
SYMMETRY:
BLOOM TIME: May-Jul
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
x x x x x

BLOOM COLOR:
White Red Pink Orange Yellow Green Blue Lavender Purple Violet Brown Not Applicable
x

FRUITING PERIOD:

DISTRIBUTION
HABITAT TYPE:
NATIVE RANGE:

HORTICULTURAL
Plant Sale Text:

Bloom Table Text:

NCBG Location:

Cultural Notes:

SOIL MOISTURE: Dry, Average
LIGHT EXPOSURE: Sun, Part Shade, Shade
MINIMUM HARDINESS ZONE:
MAXIMUM HARDINESS ZONE:
GERMINATION CODE:
WILDLIFE VALUE:
DEER RESISTANCE:

GRIM ACCESSIONS

acc_id acc_num acc_dt coll_id Action
942 1985-0632 View



GRIM PLANTINGS

plt_num acc_id loc_num pers_num inst_dt Action
1738 942 159 NCBG staff 0000-00-00 View

USDA PLANTS DATABASE

USDA Symbol: PHCO7
USDA Common Name: Sweet Mock Orange
Native Status: L48 (I), CAN (I)
Distribution: USA (CT, GA, IL, IN, KY, MA, MD, ME, MN, MO, NC, NH, NJ, NY, OH, PA, RI, SC, VA, VT, WI), CAN (NB, ON, QC)
Duration: Perennial
Growth Habit: Shrub

WEAKLEY FLORA

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Philadelphus coronarius
COMMON NAME: European Mock-orange
SYNONYMY: [= C, FNA, Mo, Pa, Va]
PHENOLOGY: May-Jul.
HABITAT: Cultivated (though moreso in the past than now), and sometimes escaped or persisting around old homesites; native of Europe.
COMMENTS: P. coronarius is the most commonly cultivated Philadelphus in our area, though it is currently considered rather old-fashioned.
RANGE MAP: Philadelphus coronarius.png

Key to Map Symbols
ABOUT FAMILY (Weakley Flora)
Hydrangeaceae Dumortier 1829 (Hydrangea Family)
SUMMARY: A family of about 17 genera and 190-220 species, trees, shrubs, vines, and herbs, primarily north temperate. As here interpreted, the family Hydrangeaceae includes two well-marked groups, the Hydrangeae (including Decumaria and Hydrangea) and the Philadelpheae (including Deutzia and Philadelphus). This group has been shown by molecular research to be unrelated to the Saxifragaceae, and to have its closest affinities to the Loasaceae, Cornaceae, and Nyssaceae (Xiang et al. 2002; Soltis, Xiang, & Hufford 1995; Morgan & Soltis 1993).
REFERENCE: Freeman in FNA (in prep.); Spongberg (1972); Soltis, Xiang, & Hufford (1995); Morgan & Soltis (1994); Xiang et al. (2002); Hufford in Kubitzki (2004).
ABOUT GENUS (Weakley Flora)
Philadelphus L. (Mock orange)
SUMMARY: A genus of 65 (or fewer) species, shrubs, of north temperate areas. The most recent monographer of the genus, Hu (1954-1955) recognizes many species and varieties on the basis of minor differences in pubescence. Many of the recognized taxa are based only on cultivated material. The native distributions of the varieties have little phytogeographic coherence, and several varieties are often reported from the same site, suggesting that they reflect merely variation within a population (if genetically based at all). For instance, Hu recognizes three varieties in P. hirsutus and five in P. inodorus, but these seem to be no more than forms. As Hu writes, the formerly recognized species, P. grandiflorus Willd., and P. laxus Schrad., are merely different forms of a species with heterogeneous leaf shape, size, and margins. Fostered by growers, propagated and distributed through cuttings, these forms have maintained their distinction in gardens since their discoveries. But when they are projected on the spectrum of variations exhibited by a large number of specimens collected from the homeland of P. inodorus Linn. they appear to be nothing but a few transitional forms. In this paper, these forms are treated as varieties. Hus varieties should be treated as forms or cultivars, if recognized at all. I have taken a conservative approach, though variation in several of our native species could use additional study.
REFERENCE: Weakley & Henrickson in FNA (in press); Hu (1954-1956)=Z; A.E. Weakley (2002); Hufford in Kubitzki (2004).

HERBARIUM RESOURCES

SERNEC: Find Philadelphus coronarius in Southeast Regional Network of Experts and Collections (if available)
UNC SERNEC: Find Philadelphus coronarius in University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Herbarium - Southeast Regional Network of Experts and Collections (if available)

WEB RESOURCES

USDA: Find Philadelphus coronarius in USDA Plants
NPIN: Find Philadelphus coronarius in NPIN Database
FNA: Find Philadelphus coronarius in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Philadelphus coronarius

NCBG IMAGE RECORDS

ID IMAGE1: 0
ID IMAGE2: 0
ID IMAGE3: 0

From the Image Gallery

No images of this plant

Go back