Plant Index


 
 
 
 

Diphasiastrum digitatum

Diphasiastrum digitatum (Dill. ex A. Braun) Holub

common running-cedar, fan ground-pine

Diphasiastrum digitatum (Common Running-cedar)
Image ID: 14157
Image by: Sorrie, Bruce A.
Image Collection: NCBG Digital Library

PLANT INDEX

ID_PLANT: DIDI8
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Diphasiastrum digitatum
Include in WOTAS: 0
Publish to Web: 1
Last Modified: 2019-12-01

GENUS INDEX

GENUS CODE: DIPHA
GENUS SCIENTIFIC: Diphasiastrum
GENUS AUTHORITY:
GENUS COMMON: Flat-branched Clubmoss, Running Cedar
GENUS SUMMARY: A genus of about 15-20 species, mostly north temperate and subarctic. This group is sometimes treated as Lycopodium section Complanata (llgaard in Kramer & Green 1990, llgaard 1987, Wikstrm & Kenrick 2000).
GENUS IDENTIFICATION:
GENUS REFERENCES: Wagner & Beitel in FNA (1993b); Haines (2003a)=Z; llgaard in Kramer & Green (1990); Wikstrm & Kenrick (2000).

FAMILY INDEX

FAMILY CODE: LYCOPO
FAMILY SCIENTIFIC: Lycopodiaceae
FAMILY AUTHORITY: Palisot de Beauvois 1802
FAMILY COMMON: Clubmoss Family
FAMILY SUMMARY: A family of 10-15 genera and about 400 species. Lycopodiaceae, along with Selaginellaceae and Isoetaceae, have now been shown to be only distantly related to other extant pteridophytes and seed plants (Pryer et al. 2001). The division of North American Lycopodium into three or more genera has been strongly advocated by Wagner & Beitel (1992), Wagner & Beitel in FNA (1993), Haines (2003a), and nearly all other recent authors. The traditionally broad Lycopodium appears to include a number of natural groups which are strikingly different from one another and have constituted separate lineages for tens to hundreds of millions of years. These natural groups are separable by numerous morphological, developmental, and anatomical characters, karyotype, and inability to hybridize. Wagner & Beitel (1992) divide Lycopodium (sensu latissimo) of our area into six genera in three subfamilies, as follows: Huperzia in Subfamily Huperzioideae, Lycopodium and Diphasiastrum in Subfamily Lycopodioideae, and Lycopodiella, Palhinhaea, and Pseudolycopodiella in Subfamily Lycopodielloideae. Haines (2003a) further divides Lycopodium (sensu lato) into three genera: Dendrolycopodium, Spinulum, and Lycopodium (sensu stricto). The reasoning behind this division is very strong, and it is here followed. Profound differences in anatomy, morphology, reproduction, gametophyte morphology, and karyotype support this separation, in addition to the very great age of these lineages. The chromosome numbers of our genera: Dendrolycopodium (x=34), Diphasiastrum (x=23), Huperzia (x=67, 68), Lycopodiella (x=78), Lycopodium (x=34), Palhinhaea (x=55), Pseudolycopodiella (x=35), and Spinulum (x=34). Øllgaard in Kramer & Green (1990) and Wikström & Kenrick (2000) follow a somewhat broader coarse, recognizing three genera for our species (corresponding to the subfamilies of Wagner & Beitel 1992), and recognizing as sections the genera of Wagner & Beitel (1992). Øllgaard states that the “genera are very distinct, and also the sections within Lycopodiella and Lycopodium seem to represent ancient, independent evolutionary lines”; later, Øllgaard has elevated the sections to generic rank (Øllgaard & Windisch 2014). Wikström & Kenrick (2000, 2001) suggest that the phylogenetic separation of Lycopodium (including Diphasiastrum) and Lycopodiella (including Pseudolycopodiella and Palhinhaea) occurred at least as long ago as the early Jurassic (208 million years before present), and the divergence of Huperzia from Lycopodium and Lycopodiella still longer ago. Based on this deep division between Huperzia and the other genera, some authors additionally advocate the recognition of Huperzia in a separate family, Huperziaceae, an opinion followed here.
FAMILY REFERENCE: Lellinger (1985); Mickel (1979); Wagner and Beitel (1992); Beitel (1979); Snyder & Bruce (1986); Wagner & Beitel in FNA (1993b); Øllgaard in Kramer & Green (1990); Wikström & Kenrick (2000, 2001); Øllgaard (1987); Haines (2003a). Key based in part on Haines (2003a).

NCBG DESCRIPTIVES

INTRO:
STEMS:
LEAVES:
INFLORESCENCE:
FLOWERS:
FRUITS:
COMMENTS:
HEIGHT:

DURATION:
HABIT:

LEAF ARRANGEMENT:
LEAF COMPLEXITY:
LEAF RETENTION:

FLORAL CHARACTERISTICS
SYMMETRY:
BLOOM TIME: Jul-Sep
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
x x x

BLOOM COLOR:
White Red Pink Orange Yellow Green Blue Lavender Purple Violet Brown Not Applicable

FRUITING PERIOD:

DISTRIBUTION
HABITAT TYPE:
NATIVE RANGE: eastern North America

HORTICULTURAL
Plant Sale Text:

Bloom Table Text:

NCBG Location:

Cultural Notes:

SOIL MOISTURE: Dry, Average, Moist/Wet
LIGHT EXPOSURE: Sun, Part Shade, Shade
MINIMUM HARDINESS ZONE:
MAXIMUM HARDINESS ZONE:
GERMINATION CODE:
WILDLIFE VALUE:
DEER RESISTANCE:

GRIM ACCESSIONS

acc_id acc_num acc_dt coll_id Action
998 1985-0694 View
4177 1992-0333 View
6072 1995-1203 View



GRIM PLANTINGS

plt_num acc_id loc_num pers_num inst_dt Action
1878 998 81 NCBG staff 1985-02-19 View
1879 998 94 NCBG staff 1985-02-19 View
6505 4177 200 NCBG staff 1993-03-01 View
8722 6072 2 NCBG staff 0000-00-00 View

USDA PLANTS DATABASE

USDA Symbol: DIDI8
USDA Common Name:
Native Status:
Distribution:
Duration:
Growth Habit:

WEAKLEY FLORA

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Diphasiastrum digitatum
COMMON NAME: Common Running-cedar, Fan Ground-pine
SYNONYMY: [= Ar, FNA, Il, Pa, Tn, Va, Z; = Lycopodium flabelliforme (Fernald) Blanch - Md, RAB, S, WV; = Lycopodium digitatum Dillenius ex A. Braun - C, K, W; = Lycopodium complanatum Linnaeus var. flabelliforme Fernald - F, G]
PHENOLOGY: Jul-Sep.
HABITAT: Dry to mesic, usually acid forests and openings, especially common in disturbed sites, such as successional pine forests.
COMMENTS: NL (Newfoundland) west to MN, south to SC, GA, AL, MS, and AR. Hickey & Beitel (1979) and Holub (1975a, 1975b) explain the nomenclatural decision to accept the epithet ‘digitatum’ over the recently more familiar ‘flabelliforme’.
RANGE MAP: Diphasiastrum digitatum.png

Key to Map Symbols
ABOUT FAMILY (Weakley Flora)
Lycopodiaceae Palisot de Beauvois 1802 (Clubmoss Family)
SUMMARY: A family of 10-15 genera and about 400 species. Lycopodiaceae, along with Selaginellaceae and Isoetaceae, have now been shown to be only distantly related to other extant pteridophytes and seed plants (Pryer et al. 2001). The division of North American Lycopodium into three or more genera has been strongly advocated by Wagner & Beitel (1992), Wagner & Beitel in FNA (1993), Haines (2003a), and nearly all other recent authors. The traditionally broad Lycopodium appears to include a number of natural groups which are strikingly different from one another and have constituted separate lineages for tens to hundreds of millions of years. These natural groups are separable by numerous morphological, developmental, and anatomical characters, karyotype, and inability to hybridize. Wagner & Beitel (1992) divide Lycopodium (sensu latissimo) of our area into six genera in three subfamilies, as follows: Huperzia in Subfamily Huperzioideae, Lycopodium and Diphasiastrum in Subfamily Lycopodioideae, and Lycopodiella, Palhinhaea, and Pseudolycopodiella in Subfamily Lycopodielloideae. Haines (2003a) further divides Lycopodium (sensu lato) into three genera: Dendrolycopodium, Spinulum, and Lycopodium (sensu stricto). The reasoning behind this division is very strong, and it is here followed. Profound differences in anatomy, morphology, reproduction, gametophyte morphology, and karyotype support this separation, in addition to the very great age of these lineages. The chromosome numbers of our genera: Dendrolycopodium (x=34), Diphasiastrum (x=23), Huperzia (x=67, 68), Lycopodiella (x=78), Lycopodium (x=34), Palhinhaea (x=55), Pseudolycopodiella (x=35), and Spinulum (x=34). Øllgaard in Kramer & Green (1990) and Wikström & Kenrick (2000) follow a somewhat broader coarse, recognizing three genera for our species (corresponding to the subfamilies of Wagner & Beitel 1992), and recognizing as sections the genera of Wagner & Beitel (1992). Øllgaard states that the “genera are very distinct, and also the sections within Lycopodiella and Lycopodium seem to represent ancient, independent evolutionary lines”; later, Øllgaard has elevated the sections to generic rank (Øllgaard & Windisch 2014). Wikström & Kenrick (2000, 2001) suggest that the phylogenetic separation of Lycopodium (including Diphasiastrum) and Lycopodiella (including Pseudolycopodiella and Palhinhaea) occurred at least as long ago as the early Jurassic (208 million years before present), and the divergence of Huperzia from Lycopodium and Lycopodiella still longer ago. Based on this deep division between Huperzia and the other genera, some authors additionally advocate the recognition of Huperzia in a separate family, Huperziaceae, an opinion followed here.
REFERENCE: Lellinger (1985); Mickel (1979); Wagner and Beitel (1992); Beitel (1979); Snyder & Bruce (1986); Wagner & Beitel in FNA (1993b); Øllgaard in Kramer & Green (1990); Wikström & Kenrick (2000, 2001); Øllgaard (1987); Haines (2003a). Key based in part on Haines (2003a).
ABOUT GENUS (Weakley Flora)
Diphasiastrum (Flat-branched Clubmoss, Running Cedar)
SUMMARY: A genus of about 15-20 species, mostly north temperate and subarctic. This group is sometimes treated as Lycopodium section Complanata (llgaard in Kramer & Green 1990, llgaard 1987, Wikstrm & Kenrick 2000).
REFERENCE: Wagner & Beitel in FNA (1993b); Haines (2003a)=Z; llgaard in Kramer & Green (1990); Wikstrm & Kenrick (2000).

HERBARIUM RESOURCES

SERNEC: Find Diphasiastrum digitatum in Southeast Regional Network of Experts and Collections (if available)
UNC SERNEC: Find Diphasiastrum digitatum in University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Herbarium - Southeast Regional Network of Experts and Collections (if available)

WEB RESOURCES

USDA: Find Diphasiastrum digitatum in USDA Plants
NPIN: Find Diphasiastrum digitatum in NPIN Database
FNA: Find Diphasiastrum digitatum in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Diphasiastrum digitatum

IMAGE USE RECORDS

ID IMAGE: 14157 - Primary Image FloraQuest Plant Detail Page (Landscape Preferred)
ID IMAGE1: 14157 - Primary Image WOTAS
ID IMAGE2: 21 - Secondary Image WOTAS
ID IMAGE3: 0 - Primary Image Plant Sale Sign (Landscape Only)
ID IMAGE4: 0 - Primary Image New Plant Sale Label (Portrait Only)

From the Image Gallery


Image ID: 93199

Image ID: 21

Image ID: 78917

Image ID: 78919

Image ID: 78925

Image ID: 78927

Image ID: 78933

Image ID: 78935

Image ID: 36899

Image ID: 93196

Image ID: 14159

Image ID: 27107

Image ID: 78924

Image ID: 78908

Image ID: 78910

Image ID: 78911

Image ID: 78912

Image ID: 78913

Image ID: 78914

Image ID: 78915

Image ID: 78916

Image ID: 78918

Image ID: 93198

Image ID: 78920

Image ID: 78921

Image ID: 93195

Image ID: 93197

Image ID: 78928

Image ID: 78929

Image ID: 78931

Image ID: 78932

Image ID: 78934

Image ID: 78936

Image ID: 93193

Image ID: 93194

Image ID: 41313

Image ID: 41321

Image ID: 78907

Image ID: 41319

Image ID: 41318

Image ID: 41317

Image ID: 41316

Image ID: 41315

Image ID: 41314

Image ID: 41320

Image ID: 41312

Image ID: 41311

Image ID: 41310

Image ID: 41309

Image ID: 41308

Image ID: 36898

Image ID: 14158

Image ID: 41322

Image ID: 41323

Image ID: 41324

Image ID: 41325

Image ID: 41326

Image ID: 41327

Image ID: 70527

Image ID: 70526

Image ID: 70523

Image ID: 70529

Image ID: 27106

Image ID: 27108

Image ID: 78909

Image ID: 70528

Image ID: 70525

Image ID: 70524

Image ID: 78923

Image ID: 78930

Image ID: 78926

Image ID: 78922
73 photo(s) available in the Image Gallery

Go back