Plant Index


 
 
 

Cunila origanoides

Cunila origanoides (L.) Britton

american-dittany, common dittany, stone-mint, wild-oregano

Synonym(s): Cunila mariana, Mappia origanoides
Cunila origanoides (American-dittany)
Image ID: 8281
Image by: Parkins, Grant Morrow
Image Collection: NCBG Digital Library

PLANT INDEX

ID_PLANT: CUOR
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Cunila origanoides
Include in WOTAS: 1
Publish to Web: 1
Last Modified: 2017-12-01

GENUS INDEX

GENUS CODE: CUNIL
GENUS SCIENTIFIC: Cunila
GENUS AUTHORITY: D. Royen ex L.
GENUS COMMON: Cunila
GENUS SUMMARY: A genus of 1 or 9 species, of e. North America (1 species) and (depending on circumscription) Mexico (8 species). Agostini, Echeverrigaray, & Souza-Chies (2012) and Drew & Sytsma (2012) show that the South American species previously included in Cunila definitely do not belong there, and that Cunila may best be treated as monophyletic, including only our species (the 8 Mexican species removed to a new genus).
GENUS IDENTIFICATION:
GENUS REFERENCES: Agostini, Echeverrigaray, & Souza-Chies (2012); Drew & Sytsma (2012); Harley et al. in Kadereit (2004).

FAMILY INDEX

FAMILY CODE: LAMIAC
FAMILY SCIENTIFIC: Lamiaceae
FAMILY AUTHORITY: Lindley 1836 or LABIATAE A.L. de Jussieu 1789
FAMILY COMMON: Mint Family
FAMILY SUMMARY: A family of about 230-250 genera and 6700-7170 species, herbs, shrubs, vines, and trees, cosmopolitan. The placement in the Lamiaceae of several genera traditionally placed in Verbenaceae (e.g. Clerodendrum) is strongly supported by several lines of evidence.
FAMILY REFERENCE: Harley et al. in Kadereit (2004).

NCBG DESCRIPTIVES

INTRO: A wiry-stemmed, sprawling perennial found on dry rocky slopes, shale barrens and other dry (often sloping) woodlands and barrens.
STEMS: Stems 4-angled, stiff verging on woody, branched, reddish-brown, and soft-hairy in the upper half but smooth below.
LEAVES: Leaves opposite, sessile or short-petiolate, oval to lance-shaped, ¾-1½ in. long, with sparingly toothed margins and dotted with tiny glands.
INFLORESCENCE:
FLOWERS: Flowers in clusters of 3–9 in upper leaf axils, pink or lavender with purple spots, ¼ in. long, the corolla a hairy tube with 4 spreading lobes and 2 prominently protruding stamens and the calyx tubular as well.
FRUITS: Fruit 4 tiny, brown nutlets.
COMMENTS: Plant gives off a strong scent of oregano when bruised.
HEIGHT: 8-16 in.

DURATION: Perennial
HABIT: Herb, Subshrub

LEAF ARRANGEMENT: Opposite
LEAF COMPLEXITY: Simple
LEAF RETENTION:

FLORAL CHARACTERISTICS
SYMMETRY: Bilateral (Zygomorphic)
BLOOM TIME: Aug-Oct
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
x x x x x

BLOOM COLOR: Lavender, pink
White Red Pink Orange Yellow Green Blue Lavender Purple Violet Brown Not Applicable
x x x

FRUITING PERIOD: Oct-Dec.

DISTRIBUTION
HABITAT TYPE: Dry forests, Outcrops and glades, Woods margins
NATIVE RANGE: eastern United States

HORTICULTURAL
Plant Sale Text: American-dittany is a many-branched southeastern native perennial that produces plentiful small pink to lavender flowers in late summer. It has a dainty appearance, though it is a tough plant and quite easy to grow. It prefers sandy soils, although any well-drained soil is acceptable. Each plant spreads approximately 18 inches. Over time, this species may continue to spread over a larger area. This species is found in open woodlands of the piedmont and coastal plain regions of North Carolina. Its pleasantly aromatic leaves have long been used in making teas.

Bloom Table Text:

NCBG Location:

Cultural Notes:

SOIL MOISTURE: Dry, Average, Well-drained
LIGHT EXPOSURE: Sun, Part Shade, Shade
MINIMUM HARDINESS ZONE: 5
MAXIMUM HARDINESS ZONE: 8
GERMINATION CODE:
WILDLIFE VALUE: Bee Friendly, Butterfly Friendly
DEER RESISTANCE:

GRIM ACCESSIONS

acc_id acc_num acc_dt coll_id Action
8 2016-0074 2016-11-04 10 View
207 2011-0019 2011-01-27 206 View
4155 1992-0311 View
4925 1995-0043 View
5679 1995-0803 View
6048 1995-1179 View
7418 2000-0161 2000-04-19 View
8071 2004-0079 2003-07-31 View


GRIM COLLECTIONS

Coll_id Project Collection date Collector Action
10 HORT 2012-11-15 Summer View
206 HORT 2003-11-07 Liloia View
1411 HORT 2006-11-14 Heiney View
1784 HORT 2005-01-01 Liloia View
1852 HORT 2006-11-13 Liloia View


GRIM PLANTINGS

plt_num acc_id loc_num pers_num inst_dt Action
7 8 24 Liloia 2016-10-25 View
8 8 25 Liloia 2016-10-25 View
9 8 16 Liloia 2016-10-25 View
419 207 32 Fache 2001-04-29 View
6483 4155 200 NCBG staff 1993-03-01 View
7344 4925 202 NCBG staff 1992-01-01 View
8193 5679 204 NCBG staff 1993-01-01 View
8698 6048 2 NCBG staff 0000-00-00 View
10414 7418 115 NCBG staff 1999-07-01 View
11343 8071 142 Liloia 2003-07-31 View

USDA PLANTS DATABASE

USDA Symbol: CUOR
USDA Common Name: Common Dittany
Native Status: L48 (N)
Distribution: USA (AL, AR, DC, DE, GA, IL, IN, KS, KY, LA, MD, MO, MS, NC, NJ, NY, OH, OK, PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WV)
Duration: Perennial
Growth Habit: Subshrub, Forb/herb

WEAKLEY FLORA

SCIENTIFIC NAME: Cunila origanoides
COMMON NAME: Stone-mint, American-dittany, Wild-oregano
SYNONYMY: [= C, F, G, K, Mo, Pa, RAB, Va, W, WV; = Mappia origanoides (Linnaeus) House - S]
PHENOLOGY: Aug-Oct; Oct-Dec.
HABITAT: Dry rocky slopes, shale barrens, other dry (usually sloping) woodlands and barrens.
COMMENTS: S. NY and PA west to MO, south to c. SC, n. GA, OK, and ne. TX (Singhurst & Holmes 2004).
RANGE MAP: Cunila origanoides.png

Key to Map Symbols
ABOUT FAMILY (Weakley Flora)
Lamiaceae Lindley 1836 or LABIATAE A.L. de Jussieu 1789 (Mint Family)
SUMMARY: A family of about 230-250 genera and 6700-7170 species, herbs, shrubs, vines, and trees, cosmopolitan. The placement in the Lamiaceae of several genera traditionally placed in Verbenaceae (e.g. Clerodendrum) is strongly supported by several lines of evidence.
REFERENCE: Harley et al. in Kadereit (2004).
ABOUT GENUS (Weakley Flora)
Cunila D. Royen ex L. (Cunila)
SUMMARY: A genus of 1 or 9 species, of e. North America (1 species) and (depending on circumscription) Mexico (8 species). Agostini, Echeverrigaray, & Souza-Chies (2012) and Drew & Sytsma (2012) show that the South American species previously included in Cunila definitely do not belong there, and that Cunila may best be treated as monophyletic, including only our species (the 8 Mexican species removed to a new genus).
REFERENCE: Agostini, Echeverrigaray, & Souza-Chies (2012); Drew & Sytsma (2012); Harley et al. in Kadereit (2004).

HERBARIUM RESOURCES

SERNEC: Find Cunila origanoides in Southeast Regional Network of Experts and Collections (if available)
UNC SERNEC: Find Cunila origanoides in University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Herbarium - Southeast Regional Network of Experts and Collections (if available)

WEB RESOURCES

USDA: Find Cunila origanoides in USDA Plants
NPIN: Find Cunila origanoides in NPIN Database
FNA: Find Cunila origanoides in the Flora of North America (if available)
Google: Search Google for Cunila origanoides

NCBG IMAGE RECORDS

ID IMAGE1: 8281
ID IMAGE2: 0
ID IMAGE3: 8281

From the Image Gallery


Image ID: 8131

Image ID: 8132

Image ID: 8280

Image ID: 14521

Image ID: 39896

Image ID: 10979
7 photo(s) available in the Image Gallery

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